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From the Scottish Rite Officers - July 2023


From the Venerable Master (July 2023)


I hope everyone is doing well, enjoying the change of weather, our beautiful surroundings, etc. etc. I wanted to take a moment to express my sincere gratitude and share my enthusiasm regarding our recent visit to the Egyptian Museum in San Jose, CA. It was an extraordinary experience, and I am thrilled that so many of our fraternity members joined in this fascinating exploration of esoteric education.


From the moment we entered the museum, we were transported to a realm of ancient wonders. The meticulously curated collection of artifacts and exhibits allowed us to immerse ourselves in the mysteries and grandeur of the ancient Egyptian civilization. The pharaohs, the pyramids, and the hieroglyphics came to life before our eyes, igniting our curiosity and imagination.


The guided tour led by knowledgeable Egyptologists was an absolute highlight of the visit. Their expertise and passion for the subject were evident as they delved into the symbolism, spiritual beliefs, and rituals of ancient Egypt. We were captivated by their insights and the stories they shared, providing us with a deeper understanding of a civilization that continues to captivate scholars and historians to this day.


One of the most remarkable aspects of our visit was the camaraderie and shared experience among our fraternity members, spouses, friends, and kids. Exploring the museum together, we engaged in thought-provoking discussions, shared observations, and exchanged ideas. The visit not only enriched our understanding of esoteric education but also strengthened the bonds of brotherhood within our fraternity.


The cultural enrichment we gained from this experience cannot be overstated. By immersing ourselves in the ancient Egyptian culture, we broadened our horizons and gained a fresh perspective on the diverse tapestry of human history. The visit to the Egyptian Museum served as a reminder of the importance of embracing diverse cultures and learning from their unique contributions.


I would like to express my heartfelt appreciation to each and every member who participated in this event. Your presence and active involvement made this visit a resounding success. It is through such collective efforts that we continue to nurture an environment of intellectual growth and lifelong learning within our fraternity.


I encourage you to reflect on this visit and carry the knowledge and inspiration gained from it into your personal and academic endeavors. Let it serve as a reminder of our commitment to the pursuit of knowledge, the value of shared experiences, and the strength of our brotherhood.


Once again, I extend my deepest gratitude to all who made this visit possible, including the organizers, volunteers, and our dedicated fraternity members. Your participation and enthusiasm are invaluable to the continued success of our fraternity.


Wishing you all continued growth, enlightenment, and success in your future explorations.

San Jose Lodge of Perfection Naresh Rampershad, 32° 2022-2023 Venerable Master



From the Wise Master (July 2023)


As a nation, Independence Day is key holiday to celebrate our United States of America. I have traveled the world and visited many countries who do not have a framework like our Constitution or might not even be civilly protected by the rule of law. Each trip I am grateful in having the Rights and Privileges we have all grown to enjoy. We aren’t perfect, but we are going in the right direction.


As a veteran I also reflect back on our day of Independence with fond memories of some of the hardest work I have ever done in my life when serving this nation, a sentiment I share with many of our Brother veterans. I reflect on memories of friends I made while serving and the purpose we served…and I smile again with gratitude.


As you celebrate this holiday, be it at a park, a cookout, or wherever you may be, I only ask you to take a moment of peace and reflect on all the things you have been blessed with while enjoying our freedoms, our rights, our privileges, and those who we love and surround ourselves with.


Perhaps bring your lodge Brothers to the membership lounge this month for some bonding and sharing of stories on how we can promote positive civility within our communities so future generations may also enjoy these Rights and Privileges.

San Jose Chapter of Rose Croix Timothy M. Lynch II, 32° 2022-2023 Wise Master



From the Commander of Kadosh (July 2023)


The Fourth of July—also known as Independence Day or July 4th—has been a federal holiday in the United States since 1941, but the tradition of Independence Day celebrations goes back to the 18th century and the American Revolution. On July 2nd, 1776, the Continental Congress voted in favor of independence, and two days later delegates from the 13 colonies adopted the Declaration of Independence, a historic document drafted by Thomas Jefferson. George Washington issued double rations of rum to all his soldiers to mark the anniversary of independence in 1778, and in 1781, several months before the key American victory at the Battle of Yorktown, Massachusetts became the first state to make July 4th an official state holiday.


After the Revolutionary War, Americans continued to commemorate Independence Day every year, in celebrations that allowed the new nation’s emerging political leaders to address citizens and create a feeling of unity. By the last decade of the 18th century, the two major political parties—the Federalist Party and Democratic-Republicans—that had arisen began holding separate Fourth of July celebrations in many large cities.


Festivities including concerts, bonfires, parades and the firing of cannons and muskets usually accompanied the first public readings of the Declaration of Independence, beginning immediately after its adoption. Philadelphia held the first annual commemoration of independence on July 4, 1777, while Congress was still occupied with the ongoing war. July 4th has been celebrated as the birth of American independence, with festivities ranging from fireworks, parades and concerts to more casual family gatherings and barbecues. The Fourth of July 2023 is on Tuesday, July 4.


The tradition of patriotic celebration became even more widespread after the War of 1812, in which the United States again faced Great Britain. In 1870, the U.S. Congress made July 4th a federal holiday; in 1941, the provision was expanded to grant a paid holiday to all federal employees.


Over the years, the political importance of the holiday would decline, but Independence Day remained an important national holiday and a symbol of patriotism.


Falling in mid-summer, the Fourth of July has since the late 19th century become a major focus of leisure activities and a common occasion for family get-togethers, often involving fireworks and outdoor barbecues. The most common symbol of the holiday is the American flag, and a common musical accompaniment is “The Star-Spangled Banner,” the national anthem of the United States.

San Jose Council of Kadosh David M. Kampschafer, 32° 2022-2023 Commander of Kadosh



From the Master of Kadosh (July 2023)


First, a belated happy Father’s Day to all! The idea for this day to honor fathers, the third Sunday in June, started in 1909 when Sonora Smart Dodd heard a sermon on Mother’s Day. She was the daughter of a Civil War veteran who raised six children after his wife died in childbirth and first celebrated in 1910. Legislation establishing it as a national holiday was signed by President Nixon in 1972.


In May we observed Mother’s Day, conceived by Anna Jarvis following her mother’s passing in 1905. With financial support from a local department store she organized the first event in 1908 because she felt American holidays were biased towards male achievements. President Wilson, in 1914, officially established the second Sunday in May as Mother’s Day, however in 1920 Ms. Jarvis became disgusted with the commercialization of the day and urged people to stop buying flowers, candy and cards for their mothers. Fortunately, that did not take hold.


Observances for other relations have come into being such as: July 23, Parent’s Day; July 26, National Aunt and Uncle Day; and (my favorite) September 10, Grandparent’s Day.


Here at the Scottish Rite we have a special day that is doubly important, Saturday, October 7. First, that is the day of the Consistory sponsored Family BBQ Day. It also happens to be National Frappe Day.


World War One resulted in the creation of two very different days. The first and most important was Armistice Day. It got its start in 1921 with the burial of an unknown WWI soldier in Arlington National Cemetery. This gave rise to Armistice Day, November 11, by Congressional resolution and twelve years later it became a national holiday. In 1947, after WWII a National Veteran’s Day was started on November 11 with parades and other ceremonies. President Eisenhower proclaimed it Veteran’s Day in 1954. Later, for about ten years the date was changed to the fourth Monday in October, but it returned to November 11 in 1978.


The other National Day WWI gave rise to was National Donut Day. During WWI, the Salvation Army sent over 250 ladies to deliver food to the soldiers on the front lines in France. The ladies found that a soldier’s helmet could be used to cook donuts, up to seven at a time. June 2 was selected, in 1938, by the Salvation Army, as the day to honor those women who delivered donuts to the troops.


There are actually two American Thanksgiving Days. We all know the fourth Thursday in November which dates to the Civil War. There is a much older one, Schwenkfelder Thanksgiving, observed on September 22. It dates to 1734 when the second group of Schwenkfelder followers arrived in Pennsylvania. This Thanksgiving was originally celebrated by feasting on butter, apple butter, bread and water.


It seems that just about every day of the year is a National “Something” Day. Walt Disney Day is the first Monday in December. National Taco Day, October 4, started by Del Taco as a promotion. It is also National Vodka Day. August 24 is National Waffle Day, commemorates the date in 1869 when Cornelius Swarthout received a patent for the first waffle iron. It is also National Pluto Demoted Day observing Pluto’s removal as a planet. February 5 is National Shower with a Friend Day, the idea of a plumbing company. But let’s not forget January 18, National Peking Duck Day.


If you go online, you can find each day of the year has multiple National Day Ofs. Say, is there still a Del Taco in Campbell?

San Jose Consistory Richard M. Fisher, III, 33° 2022-2023 Venerable Master of Kadosh




From the Chief Knight (July 2023)


In June, our Chapter of KSA was able to share an Accolade ceremony (knighting) and an Elevation ceremony (raising a knight to the rank of Knight of the First Order) during the stated meeting dinner. We appreciate all the questions and interest following the dinner, thank you.


As we mentioned before, KSA’s big annual outing is the Highland Games on September 2 & 3 in Pleasanton. So far we have three other Valley’s KSA chapters planning to attend with us. I would encourage everyone to come out for some fun on either or both days. We’ll have cold drinks and snacks available along with some chairs to take a rest if needed. Pipes & Drums, Highland Dance, shops galore, and whiskey-aplenty will be at the games in addition to awesome feats of strength and athletic skill.


KSA is a service based organization that helps support activities throughout the Valley. Most of our work is done while we are at the monthly stated meetings which keeps the load light while helping things run smoother. During important visits, KSA provides an Arch of Steel salute to dignitaries as well as providing a Flag Presentation team. The Flag Presentation team is also often called upon for blue lodge installations. No kilt is needed and we have a cooler hat than the other bodies :).


Come out and see what we are about.

San Jose Knights of St. Andrew Timothy M. Lynch II, 32° 2022-2023 Chief Knight, KSA

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